Encore of Revival: America, June 7, 2021

The DOJ set an interesting precedent by siding with Google against the DOJ. This DOJ action transcends presidential administrations. The DOJ ordered Google to hand over email info about a few New York Times reporters—without Google telling the newspaper. Google resisted the government on the basis of its private contract with the New York Times. Finally, the DOJ caved and allowed a top executive to know, which led to negotiations and legal counsel.

Based on the DOJ having cooperated with Google’s private contract on user privacy, we now have a precedent that no digital company would be obligated to hand over user information without informing the users, not even in the face of a court order. Therefore, there is no excuse for censorship of private users on social media, including former President Trump. Companies only take users content and information if they want to, never because they must because, well, they don’t need to anymore.

We don’t know what Trump really thinks because social media giants found an excuse to mute him. If they want us to know what he truly thinks, they will unmute him. But, they don’t unmute him, so no one can trust hearsay about what Trump thinks. The latest nonsense was about him being re-instated in August. But, if Trump really thought that, Twitter and Facebook would allow him to say it for himself because it would be so embarrassing. If he’s too dangerous to be allowed to speak, then what they say he says is too dangerous to trust.

Social media giants are losing their power. Facebook objected to “digital services” taxes around the world. Now, all corporations face a flat 15% corporate tax, in G7 markets. Leaders facetiously thanked Facebook for urging governments to remove “digital services” tax. Facebook will get its way, which means Facebook will pay more, so Facebook won’t get its way because Facebook got its way. The same could be said about what Facebook doesn’t let Trump say for himself.

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Encore of Revival: America, May 10, 2021

Social media and elections approach their days of reckoning.

Facebook banned President Trump, supposedly for life, but they aren’t sure, and they have no standards. This is not any problem particular to Facebook, but to software developers at large. They have the power to play judge and jury with their customers—and in many situations they need to. But in their judging, they never took the time to research one of the most basic matters of justice: standards. Facebook seems to think that because they are a company that their customers don’t have any rights unless Facebook gives those rights. China says the same about Xinjiang, and Facebook gets ever closer to being declared a utility, especially with claims like this.

As for the elections, local governments continue to recount, but there was little to no dispute on counting. The disputes were about certifying elections—either at a metaphoric gunpoint like happened with threats in Michigan, or at polling stations with overt rule-breaking. Those are the issues not being addressed, suggesting this is some kind of grand-scale manipulation technique.

Nation-wide reform is inevitable, from government to the private sector.

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Encore of Revival: America, February 22, 2021

Drama and theater! The veil is lifting. Tech giants are useful, but they seem driven by parasites. The same can be said of legislative bodies, entertainment giants, and prosecutors going after the January 6 Capitol Insurrection.

Jessica Watkins has an interesting story to tell. Her defense of January 6 could convince the public that the prosecution is over-stating its case, looking to hang anyone and everyone possible as payback for the Capitol being breached. In acquitting those who occupied their legislative floor in 2014, Taiwan’s dignity far outshines that of America’s. To the US Supreme Court: You have a higher bar to reach, so to speak.

Social media takes a bumpy turn for the better. Australia’s social media law is somewhat vague, but mainly forces dialog. As understood by the Times, the Aussie law, along with the infamous ‘Articles 11’ of the EU law, aren’t aimed at the normal guy nor the pundit. Instead, they aim at huge tech giants who use AI to aggregate enormous numbers of new stories as one more added feature of their already behemoth-sized tech services. The infamous EU ‘Article 13’ law banning memes is another story. While Europe wants to tax links on Apple and Google, then ban memes for nearly everyone, Australia just wants Facebook and Google to have a conversation when they re-post part of a news story.

While the giants fight, originality steps up. In the approaching shadow of it becoming illegal to use any old music on YouTube, the need for original music spikes. Such laws were lobbied for by big entertainment companies; ironically it is big entertainment that now faces its fiercest competition from billions of ‘little guys’—who used to be their customers.

So, to the tech giants, tech-phobic lawmakers, copyright mongers, and prosecutors: Keep overreaching. Just keep overreaching.

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Encore of Revival: America, May 6, 2019

While war brews in the Far East, the West debates social media. Populism is taking over from all sides. Even Conservatives aren’t being so conservative in their rhetoric, though they still express their ideals at the election polls more than anywhere else. Liberals express their ideals everywhere they can.

Nancy Pelosi already has her strategy lined up no matter the outcome of the 2016 election. “Social justice warriors” are taking over the Left to such a point that Democrats as we know them may not be a viable party much longer. The institution will survive a bit longer, but it will change. Rosie O’Donnell and Megyn Kelly learned that the hard way; Joe Biden is about to.

Most debates are no longer two-sided. More and more issues themselves belong to either the Right or the Left. Conservatives don’t want to hear about the Mueller investigation at all. Liberals don’t want to hear reports on the economy. The only thing Congress and the country seem to be united on is China and support for Taiwan. For now, Americans aren’t finding many other reasons for unity at home—for now.

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Encore of Revival: America, March 11, 2019

The nation is polarizing. Conservatives are becoming more conservative; Liberals are becoming more liberal. The veil of mediocrity has been lifted and people are being forced to fly their true colors.

Democratic Congresswoman Omar from Minnesota called out Obama for being a “pretty face” more “polished” than Trump, while denouncing Obama’s policies. Freshman Congresswoman Cortez and veteran Senator Sanders decried capitalism while unemployment is at a record low and jobs are returning to America—jobs which Obama said would not come back. That only adds to the lists of failed Obama promises. Yet, Democrats still think it was the Obama ideological opposition that failed, not their own—except for Omar who thinks everyone failed, kind of.

It’s one thing to not know when one lost, it’s another thing to not know when one will lose again. What better place to discuss a campaign for the anti-enterprise 2020 ticket than in the Caribbean!

Socialist cities across America are in a battle against rural American sheriffs and prosecutors.

Don’t attack people with your posts on social media—but if you’re CNN, that’s common practice, though still defamation—at least according to the lawyer for the Covington High School student who was treated by CNN and the Washington Post the way Facebook doesn’t want you to treat real bad guys who actually did something wrong—maybe. It all depends on opinion, but there is one solution: utilities.

Facebook and Google are in the fast lane on the highway to “Utilityhood”. Irritating as it is, a free market can’t force Facebook to cooperate with Vine when there is neither profit nor loss in our “free-and-open” Internet. By allowing Facebook to make market decisions in its own interests, it will be easier to sway public opinion toward government crushing the Facebook and Google empires by making them public utilities.

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Encore of Revival: America, February 4, 2019

Apple can crackdown on Google and Facebook, but America can’t crack down on it’s own private property and protection for citizens?

This week, the president’s State of the Union Address will convene on schedule. The guest list is said to be interesting, though at press time, the president had not yet announced his guests. The regular speech is one way of fulfilling a Constitutional requirement that the president:

…shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient.

The normal way of fulfilling this Constitutional requirement (the speech) was under threat by the government shutdown. That shutdown ended with a temporary budget, while Congressional Republicans proved that they saw “shutdown” as the strategy, while Congressional Democrats and President Trump—each in their own way—proved the shutdown as an unintended consequence of their “wall” or “anti-wall” strategy. Now, the State of the Union is confirmed on the calendar. The interesting parts won’t be about the wall as much as they will be about China.

China—the one thing that could unite all sides of American debates. Beware the peace of a nation in need of an enemy to unify them, for that peace may be shortlived.

Hot on the Capitol Hill agenda is Obama’s DACA program (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals). The argument basically goes that young trees can be transplanted, but once they have grown, re-transplanting them again can kill them. Children are innocent and—though beneficiaries of the free economy, free speech, and freedom of America’s wonderful and ought-to-be-sought socioeconomic system—children would not be at-fault for receiving the great benefit of America’s growing greatness. So, why punish the children? That’s the argument in DACA’s defense.

One example that isn’t used enough to defend DACA is the Back-to-Africa movement, of the 1800s, which sought to return Black Americans to Africa. The idea was absurd, demonstrating no knowledge of international life and culture. Though an injustice, forcing a reversal after history has moved on only makes the injustice worse. DACA was such an injustice and the way forward cannot be explained in, shall we say, “black and white”.

From the Conservative perspective, the best solution to DACA claimants (the children in question) is to punish the perpetrators, not the children. In other words, punish the parents. The following course would do just that: Any illegally entered parents must report themselves and prepare for deportation or, with a clean criminal record, be given 30 days to prepare for a speedy and unconditional return to their home country. Then, children wishing to claim DACA status must meet minimum age and circumstantial requirements that prove returning to a life in their family’s country would cause a lower-quality life, such as not knowing the language or already having developed American credentials, must not have citizenship with that nation, and be banned from any dual citizenship with that nation for ten years.

This would cut off the parents from their children. If they wanted their children to be American because of America’s greatness, this would give them that at a price worth paying. For anyone who thinks the price is not worth paying, the DACA benefits would not be necessary. Let the people choose themselves and let America be a place of immigrants willing to pay the price of freedom that never comes free.

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