Cadence of Conflict: Asia, April 7, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, April 7, 2015

When viewing China as a corporate conglomerate attempting a hostile takeover, with the goal of complete market monopoly in every sector, Asia’s conflict only starts to make sense. But the problem goes deeper. According to credible, anonymous reports, there are “mental health conditions” that are frequent in Chinese-Asian culture.

Specifically is the belief that, “If another individual does not join our group (family, organization, business, club, etc.) or otherwise comply with our unilateral demands, then that other individual is proactively and maliciously attempting to change our group’s destiny. Then, our only option is to either dominate that other individual at all costs, even at the expense of our own goals and/or survival, and to sever all communication except communication for us to achieve our ‘unchangeable destiny’, which is for that individual to join or obey us one way or another.” Because of the adamantine, unabashed, and costly determination to hold to this kind of belief, this recurring belief may be an ideal candidate for a clinically-certifiable personality disorder. Read More

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, March 30, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, March 30, 2015

China continues to takeover the Pacific with ships and reclaimed reefs. Taiwan’s DPP continues to knock down statues of KMT-Nationalist leader Chiang Kai-shek, which further indicates that Taiwan’s popularity favors national sovereignty. The same sympathy continues to slant in Hong Kong. China inaugurates its controversial flight M503, seven kilometers from Taiwan’s airspace, the Taiwanese aren’t happy about it, and the KMT-Nationalists and Communist Chinese aren’t happy that they aren’t happy. A lot of people in the Pacific aren’t happy. Read More

Cadence of Conflict: Asia-America, December 15

Cadence of Conflict: Asia-America, December 15

Hong Kong’s Umbrella movement has completely shifted out of the public eye. Beijing and Hong Kong authorities will likely view this as a victory, while the West and the East Asian region know that steam does not vanish merely because it escapes the pot.

America’s Republican party seems that they haven’t learned from Taiwan’s failing KMT-Nationalists. The recent bait-and-switch involving two tea party Republicans plucked the ceiling off of corporate campaign donation limits. This means that the GOP knows they need the tea party vote, but hope to use corporate dollars to overcome the people. The problem is that the KMT’s corptocracy failed on November 29 at Taiwan’s local elections. Now, the highest leader the KMT can find to lead their stock-holding political party is the mayor of New Taipei—comparable to if Republican’s had to turn to a Chicago suburb’s mayor for an RNC leader during the W. years, rather than the President being the leader as is normally the case.  · · · →