Tempo: April 17, 2015

Cuba isn’t on the terrorist list anymore. TIME thinks American air travelers shouldn’t be either, bruising the TSA. Navy “LOCUST drones” on the rise? RINOs fought “in name only” against Obama’s Iran deal. News trend: Hillary’s “relatability” is doctored, the reports really trend. Hillary files coach, UK reports as embarrassingJapan is serious about nuke plant disaster evac. Radioactive material trends in Mexican theft. Products from Israel’s West Bank are to be labeled accordingly when sold in the EU; it’s controversial. Etsy is public, up 86% first day. Review of Bitcoins: Establishing Trust In The Bitcoin Ecosystem  · · · →

Tempo: April 16, 2015

O’Reilly—and his opp guest—say much on police violence already said at @PacificDT, more in upcoming Encore. ISIS Camp in Mexico confirmed by Mexico. New F-35 jet is ready to dominate as F-16 era fades away, but nothing new is without software problems these days. Another USAF emergency landing, this time in Cali, the recent headline was in Taiwan. The controversial Patriot Act is up for another renewal. The IMF isn’t as forgiving as China’s new AIIB may be, making it hard to argue with China. Firefox is shaking up for a comeback move. Startup tech mergers are in the wind—and the wind is strong. The real cause of climate change: 5 Truths About Earth’s Magnetic Reversal.  · · · →

Tempo: April 15, 2015

An ISIS base was found 8 miles from US in Mexico. Congress whomps Obama, demoralizing hope for any veto. Police protestors shut down the Brooklyn Bridge—and that’s just the beginningGoogle’s in trouble in Europe. 4% of the people got Obamacare right. The US is prepared for a cyber attack. But the cyber team can’t attack others—right. Jerusalem and the Palestinians seem to be having secret talks, and Hamas may be in their mutual crosshairs. Philly police being investigated for targeting “white khaki males” to plant drugs. People are impersonating soldiers. And Hillary is still making headlines. Bonus: 13 Podcasts for Growing Your Business  · · · →

Tempo: April 14, 2015

Faith motivated Brandi Temple to start Lolly Wolly Doodle. Hillary still dominates news. O’Reilly thinks it’s funny. People don’t recognizer her in Ohio. But North Korea’s first lady made an appearance for the first time and makes Japan’s headlines. Net neutrality rules face Republicans. From the lift on sanctions, Hamas is getting better supplies from Iran. Bonus: 9 of the Most Common Mistakes That Will Tank a Startup  · · · →

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, April 13, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, April 13, 2015

China’s new bank (AIIB, Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank) dominated headlines this week. AIIB’s history suggests China wants infrastructure money without being told to clean up the environment, respect human rights, or play nice with their hope-to-be soon-to-be-annexed neighbors. The US could have jumped-in and controlled AIIB, but didn’t, as if the US anticipates that AIIB may lose money after, say, a conflict in the Pacific.

The bank seems to be a line in the sand for US allies in the Pacific, but not so much in Europe. The Internet is flooded with articles claiming that China won’t control their own bank, some of which Cadence has too much dignity to link to. Does hiring Westerners to run the Chinese bank make it less “Chinese”? Beijing marketing departments might think so.

Isn’t it interesting that China is creating a bank for infrastructure while, at the same time, China is building up their military to knock-out existing infrastructure in places like Taiwan? All this Pacific infrastructure talk smells a little “fishy”, as it were. China wants to invest. The US doesn’t. The bank controversy may not be about politics, but about money—gambling on who will get a return on their investment after… “something” happens and “someone” wins.

China is building up in the Pacific and the US isn’t afraid to say so, especially to Taiwan. Taiwan made more great poses for the camera with the US, which China won’t like. Taiwan is rolling out a new political party, which the Establishment won’t like.

Chinese corruption and the environment crossed swords this week. No one seems to have asked why China has so much corruption. The answer would likely be that strong households maintain themselves first, while those who think more about their neighbors often leave the own homes in disrepair.

Chinese and Western press exchanges drew a little more attention than normal this week. We see a pattern in both press and policy: Poke at China and they spill their beans; oppose China from abroad and they try to annex you, “by force if necessary”. Michael Cole deserves a medal for getting a Chinese general to give away more of Beijing’s intentions, this time with classy Beijing graphics, though the Pacific Daily Times doesn’t exactly share a coterminous opinion on Israel; we like Israel at the Times. But Michael is as informed as he is thought provoking—and good at provoking the PLA into revealing strategy. With ISIS on the move so much that even Japan is watching, we all might come around to appreciating Israel for standing in their way.

What makes a nation aggressive? Will China give up its claim to the map if the good guys erase themselves from it? An academic blog article encourages the US to infiltrate China’s new bank, claiming that the US is partially to blame for its creation. While joining China’s AIIB might be a good idea—had war on the horizon not made it a risky investment for the Yanks—China didn’t create that AIIB bank because of lack of control in the IMF.

Obama’s election wouldn’t make Al Sharpton complain less nor would Israel’s annihilation suddenly make ISIS stop burning people alive. Limbaugh predicted it: Obama’s election preceded a spike in ethnic tension in America. ISIS is angry that they don’t already control Europe because Israel is in their way. If China controlled the IMF, the AIIB would already be open for business. And if China acquired Taiwan, Beijing would soon publish genealogical claims to Tokyo, and why not Jerusalem and Tehran too?

Top Stories

Britain’s Support for China’s AIIB Means Japan, Parroting the U.S., Is Trapped

…Old, but shows the controversy surfacing.

US reports on Chinese naval threat to Taiwan

“Friction between China and its neighbors appears increasingly likely as Beijing seeks to deter rival activities and assert its own claimed rights and interests.”

The Great Chinese Lie About Taiwan

…From J Michael Cole on China and the controversy *See more under Taiwan

Retired PLA General responds to J Michael Cole

…Photo of a Chinese General’s backlash against Cole (in his Chinese article) *See more under Taiwan

Territorial Claims in the South China Sea

…NY Times maps from 2012, informative

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Encore of Revival: America, April 13, 2015

Encore of Revival: America, April 13, 2015

Both Right and Left in America have problems. The problem with American Conservatism is that, though it holds to effective values, it uses “tradition” as its defense, rather than wisdom. Not most Conservatives, but many are gruff or condescending on their soapboxes; few Conservatives care. The problem with Liberalism is that it over-prioritizes “permission to play” and under-prioritizes survival through wisdom, self-control, and hard work. Liberals demand more while disallowing what it takes to get more—the Old Testament Pharaoh’s “more bricks, no straw” policy is a prime example. Both Conservatives and Liberals talk about rights without responsibility: the right to work without the responsibility to work, the right to carry guns without the responsibility of high school militia training.

Obama was a learning experience. Elections can have consequences that are not as easy to see as was thought. The Boomers didn’t teach their children about politics. Now, the children are learning the hard way. At least they are learning. Never try, never learn; cheers to trying! Gen Y’s mistakes have taught them more than the Boomers taught them.

Hillary has time on her side, so to speak. Ted Cruz has the truth on his side. Scott Walker has the notoriety of being attacked by Obama and speaks clearly on issues. Rand Paul has a “strategy”, so he told Rush, but the strategy seems to unite Americans in the middle, rather than The People’s Party strategy, which is to promote political values without compromise, yet allow opt-outs. Other nonsense Republicans are tossing their hats in the presidential ring when they should already know that they can’t win.

Police violence is not increasing, but the reports finally are. Public outrage is overdue. Domestic conflict with police could increase soon. Much has gone on behind the scenes that’s unacceptable. Governments have focused on making the police strong, rather than instilling a police culture of humble strength—quicker takedowns and fewer regrets. The police need Jesus. We all do. We’ll find him, one way or another.

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