Cadence of Conflict: Asia, November 11, 2019

Hong Kong has presented the world with the ethical question of confronting bullies. Say there is a bully at school who quietly eats whosever lunch he wants, stealing anyone’s homework he wants, until one day someone says something and the bully gets violent. In theory, most people agree that the bully started it. But in practice, when it comes time to stand up to the bullies of life, even the biggest Braveheart fans place the blame for the fight on the one who had the conscience to stand up to the bully. So, are Hong Kong protestors to blame for not going along to get along while China quietly violates its treaty with the UK, denies human rights, and refuses to regulate police conduct?

China says restoring social order in Hong Kong is the “most pressing issue”, but obviously not as important as destroying anything that stands in the way of Chinese Communist hegemony.

In a double-standard, Taiwan is having to adjust its laws to deal with Chinese interference. The CCP is paying news outlets to spread its propaganda in Taiwan. It got caught having a fake news site and is now resorting to outsourcing. The Taiwanese don’t think that publishing what China tells someone to publish is “free speech”.

Xi Jinping’s decision to keep Carrie Lam as CEO of Hong Kong only makes sense, notwithstanding it proves interference by pure definition. The Chinese Communist Party would never dispose of such an efficient creator of chaos. Chaos is always the first phase of the CCP taking over a resistant people; the second phase is to send in the military and—well, do what China’s military does so well. While the Western press explains keeping Carrie as a way to avoid opening a can of worms, the Chinese have much more sinister intentions as history proves.

More crud hit the fan this week, over and over, again and again, evermore. A college student not connected with a nearby protest tried to escape a parking lot just after police fired tear gas, then fell to his death. As expected, police denied any wrongdoing.

A woman rumored to be only 16 years old passed a police station Tsuen Wan where she claims to have been ordered inside, then gang raped by four masked men. Meeting some of the criteria of a rape victim, she found she was pregnant a few weeks after the incident, the young woman was reportedly suffering from depression, and had an abortion last Thursday. The investigation is ongoing, but, in the current atmosphere, police have done little elsewhere to stop such stories from being believable.

Over the weekend, police arrested six lawmakers who effectively filibustered Carrie Lam’s annual report back in May. Six reporters wore Chinese letters on hardhats at a police press conference, spelling a Cantonese request to investigate police. This was in response to two reporters having been arrested. The police department sent formal objection letters to the six reporters’ press agencies. Lawmakers and journalists should be immune to such arrests in order to prevent political interference. But, Hong Kong police no longer wear ID tags on their uniforms, and China says the unrest in Hong Kong started because police don’t have enough power.

Western foreigners visiting Hong Kong have started to join protests. It’s arguably bad form, though it indicates that the world feels a sense of solidarity in standing up to China’s bullying anywhere and everywhere it happens. China sees it as proof of interference while the West sees it as successful marketing from the Hong Kong protesters. The problem with China’s “interference proof” argument is that foreign attendees after the fact do not prove any causality before the fact. But, when being a mouthpiece rather than a think tank has been the habit for so long, Chinese wouldn’t understand the difference.

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Cadence of Conflict: Asia, August 26, 2019

The Hong Kong police have lost public trust. They’ve cried, “Victim!” after their injuries were proven to be from self defense when they were the assailants. They illegally shot tear gas canisters as harmful projectiles in violation of international law and from windows high enough to kill someone if a canister landed on someone’s head. One girl lost an eye because the police shot rubber bullets at the crowd at point blank range and one bullet passed through her protective face mask. Yet, the police claim that rubber bullets don’t cause harm.

Now, peace turns to instant violence just because these police arrive. Or, perhaps it’s because they arrive, then start pounding their batons against their shields as if they were Roman soldiers about to charge.

At the Yuen Long MTR Station in a somewhat remote part of Hong Kong’s New Territories, protestors were loud, but not violent, until the police showed up. From well-earned fear, protestors tore up the place to block the police from blinding someone else. Trash cans and other furnishings were turned on side, fire extinguishers made a smokescreen, and the students pulled down a gate to block the way between themselves and the violent police of Hong Kong.

The greatest mistrust of Hong Kong police isn’t their violence, but their inaction. The great criminals control the government. Perhaps protestors believe the police should enforce the Basic Law by forcefully unseating CEO Carrie Lam for violating the Sino-British Joint Declaration of 1984. But, they don’t because they have become a tool of Beijing’s interference, proven most by the usual Human Rights violations of Beijing.

But, Hong Kongers’ fears are still greater, sharing an overlap with US President Trump. China wants to Sinicize the world, as the 2008 Olympics opening ceremony showed—as Hong Kong and Taiwan show—as America’s economy shows.

As if Hong Kong’s problems haven’t shown enough about the greater threats looming over the world from the Far East, South Korea’s vindictive administration keeps making trouble. This week, South Korea ended an intel sharing agreement with Japan, then stepped up military drills near an island disputed by Japan.

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Encore of Revival: America, September 2, 2019

Comey’s leaks are a matter of example and precedent. He must be prosecuted to the fullest extent possible because we can’t have other FBI employees doing what he did—Republican or Democrat. More importantly, we must honor those FBI employees who could have done what he did, perhaps thought about doing what he did, but refused to break principles and protocol. For police, it’s all about protocol.

The FBI director knew information that should not be given to the public. He knew it was wrong, what he did. So, he released it to the public through other people, lawyers and the news media. He claimed he did this—which he knew was wrong—because he loved his country and the FBI. If he loved the FBI, then he shouldn’t have insulted the thousands of FBI employees who would surely be thrown in prison had they done the same thing.

If Comey is not prosecuted and fully indited, then Wikileaks founder Julian Assange shouldn’t be either and Edward Snowden should receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom because their leaks showed actual corruption of people like Comey. But, by not inditing Comey, we see clearly that the current Justice Department is run by double standards.

Double standards are a problem for courts, but they are a deadly epidemic for police. Once police are encouraged to live by a double standard, police brutality spreads. Not inditing Comey encourages and invites just that, spitting in the face of the good cops society needs.

If Comey believes his claim, that releasing this information was necessary, then he should voluntarily plead guilty and suffer for the sake of his cause, showing how much he truly cares about his country and its police. But, he won’t because he’s not a true believer. Thankfully, some still are.

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Cadence of Conflict: Asia, July 29, 2019

China says that Hong Kong CEO Carrie Lam may not resign because she must remain in power to clean up the mess China started and blames on her. Albeit, staying in power to clean up her scape-goat mess is impossible because cleaning up that mess requires her to resign as the people demanded. The “mess” includes her being there in the first place—because her election was not from self-governance as Hong Kongers were promised in 1984. The mess also includes China saying who may and may not resign—because China doesn’t get a say about one grain of sand in Hong Kong until 2047.

The whole problem goes back to China’s inability to not meddle. A Beijing-managed group based in Shenzhen has been carefully researching and observing the developments in Hong Kong so that Beijing can know how to properly respond—whatever that’s supposed to mean. Make no mistake, they aren’t trying to understand how to govern a free people or understand the reasonable requests of a free and self-motivated economy. They aren’t trying to learn whatever wisdom might have made the West so rich and powerful in the first place. No, Beijing is on a mission to Sinicize Hong Kong out of being Hong Kong.

The current task is to figure out how to “disappear” 2 million Hong Kongers without the world noticing. Hong Kong’s police under-reported the 2 million turnout; they’ll probably under-report the number of “disappeared” people as well, and they need research to make it sound convincing. If the protests had happened in Xinjiang, Beijing wouldn’t need to do such research because the world wouldn’t be watching because making 2 million people disappear in Xinjiang was never a problem in the past. And, that’s what Hong Kongers rightly fear.

Beijing’s research narrative presumes that Hong Kongers only fear being “Xinjianged” because some phantom, invisible Western influence influenced them. They have no proof of this, but that’s Beijing’s presumption. If there’s a problem, it must be America’s fault. So, Beijing’s approach is to sneak around and spy from the shadows until this phantom “influence monster” from the evil West shows its face. That’s Beijing’s plan to solve the Hong Kong problem.

Now, there’s constitutional discussion about where and how Hong Kong’s “Basic Law” allows military intervention from China, namely if Hong Kong’s government asks. But, the whole discussion misses the whole point—that Hong Kong’s Basic Law is based on the Sino-British Joint Declaration of 1984 of non-interference from Beijing. Beijing already interfered by not allowing self-governance in Hong Kong as promised. Not letting Carry Lam resign is yet another violation of that promise and premise. So, technically, the law beneath the Basic Law has already been dissolved. And, Beijing only incriminates itself further by claiming that promises made in the past don’t need to be kept because they are in the past.

Pay attention because, while Taiwan is a linchpin that will bring America into war with China, Hong Kong is the linchpin that will bring the UK and Europe along with it.

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Encore of Revival: America, July 16, 2018

Trump is on tour, not without protesters who only know the version of America shown to them through less popular news outlets which, accordingly, need overseas audiences. Usually, good, working people stay home and at work, then vote in elections to change the landscape, while unpopular protesters demonstrate where it only makes non-binding noise. Still, it is good for all Britons to have their opportunity to voice their concerns, even to the leader of another nation.

Protesting and demonstrating are never bad. Once one tries to silence the opposition, such as the SJW movement in America has, tyranny’s way is paved for those same silencers to be silenced on the pendulum’s return.

Trump is neither kowtowing nor blaming in Europe, he is stating conflicts of interest. Take for example Germany’s former president leading a company that will profit from Russia selling gas to Germany, while the US pays the bill to defend Germany from Russia. Something is terribly wrong there. Trump’s repeat word for that seated pre-dinner speech was the word “inappropriate”.

The Helsinki summit between Putin and Trump is overdue. Reagan made peace with his adversaries. Even Gorbachev took a long moment to pause the line while he reflected at the late president’s visitation.

Diplomats behind desks in carpeted offices see negotiations as a way to greedily push for what they want, without concern for the other guy. As a business owner and negotiator, Trump understands that other countries want to help their economies grow and thrive. That will make a world of difference, likely to the world.

At home, the police in America only shoot and kill without a trial when it’s the “bad guys”. But, they seem to be exempt from US military rules of engagement: Do not fire until fired upon. The Chicago police video shows an officer with pistol in hand while revealing a pistol still in the suspect’s belt. This is a difficult situation to judge.

Police want to keep people safe. Carrying a gun without proper training is dangerous, but the government doesn’t offer the Constitutionally required militia training for all citizens. The Second Amendment gives that man a right to carry that gun just as he did, regardless of Chicago’s unconstitutional laws. But, too many Blacks in America vote against the Constitution. Police should be softer in their approach, while their concerns about safety and desire to apprehend “bad guys” are still understandable.

It looks like SCOTUS’s nominee Brett Kavanaugh will be approved by the Senate just as likely as any other. If by slim chance he isn’t approved, the next nominee won’t be any easier to pass through the Senate. Whatever seat is up in the next round of a SCOTUS appointee will likely be more Conservative than Kavanaugh. But, the courts can sort out all of our problems. America really needs the same kind of sit-down that Putin is getting with Trump in Helsinki.

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Thursday, March 31, 2015

Ben Innes’ terrorist selfie on EgyptAir (Guardian)

40k petition: Carry guns at GOP convention (Quartz)

…Secret Service: No. (NBC)

FBI Comey to interview Hillary (WA Times)

Video: Cruz comedy, which car pedal for Trump? (The Hill – Jimmy Kimmel)

Japan-bound plane goes back to Hawaii, violent passenger, yoga (San Diego Union-Tribune)

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